An Artist Reimagined Common Brands In A Single-Color Dystopian World

kunel gaur

Imagine a monochromatic, dystopian world where the renowned brands that are part of day-to-day life remain but in a surreal form. Well, that’s what Indian artist Kunel Gaur did, and the results are surprisingly satisfying. These stripped-back versions are arguably an enhancement on what are already classic designs.

Louis Vuitton

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

The iconic Louis Vuitton bag is perhaps as famous for its brown leather coloring as it is for its print, and both are enthusiastically reimagined here by Gaur. The ‘LV’ logo print is a justly minimalist sans serif font, and the complementary decorative stars are subtle additions. As for the color, the colorless look offers an exciting departure from the Louis Vuitton accessory adored by many across the world. Simple, but still glamorous.

Coca Cola

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

The can of Coca-Cola is debatably the most familiar beverage on the planet. Therefore, it’s captivating to see this soda icon given such a drastic facelift, stripping away the elegant font and washing out the bright red color we know so well. ‘Coca-Cola’ is such an influential brand; however, it somehow remains recognizable with just the name decked across the can, not trusting on font type or brand colors to stand out from the crowd.

Tropicana

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

There’s something too good about Gaur’s ‘Tropicana.’ Cartons these days are so often sheltered in so much information and imagery, and it’s hard to decrypt what’s inside.T he simple logo, and modest orange split in two is the only design structures, the rest of the carton kept restricted for essential dietary information.

Marlboro

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

You can almost imagine Marlboro rebranding precisely like this. The simplicity of the design is fascinating to a small packet of cigarettes. Marlboro is the top name in tobacco, so why not just keep things simple and operative with the title front and center, nothing else. The only misperception with the monochromatic design is differentiating between Marlboro’s different types of cigarettes, such as menthol and light.

Pringles

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

Out of all these reformats, this is the one we like the utmost. Much like the crisps inside, the effortlessness on the side of this fabulous tin is addictive! This is what we imagine Pringles would appear like in the 1950s, and they could do worse than going back in time with this design.

Subway

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

Gaur has given Subway a slick new logo here, which looks like a line of code. With the green and yellow gone, the name and the offering take pride of place on the packaging, and it’s advantageous. Like many on this list, we honestly prefer this dystopian take to the current design.

Chanel

kunel gaur
Kunel Gaur

What’s fascinating about this one is that Chanel No.5, as we know, is identifiable more from the color rather than the packaging. It’s retailed in a glass bottle, with the gold perfume inside, providing a significant impact. Here, Gaur packages the fragrance in what appears like a metallic container, giving the consumer no clue as to the iconic product’s color. It’s retro-chic, but not luxe as Chanel intended.

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